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Adirondack Salmon Chowder

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Adirondack Salmon Chowder

From the Adirondack Series by Musky Bob

If this doesn’t make your mouth water in anticipation on those cool Fall or Winter days nothing will.

· ½ stick butter

· ¼ cup flour

· ½ cup chopped onion

· 6 slices bacon, diced

· ½ cup diced celery

· 1½ teaspoons garlic powder not garlic salt

· 1 teaspoon old bay seasoning

· 1 ½ cup diced potatoes

· ½ bag baby carrots, cut bite size

· 1 cup chicken broth

· 1 cup grated parmesan cheese

· 1 teaspoon salt

· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

· 1 teaspoon parsley

· 2 bay leaves

· ½ teaspoon dried dill weed

· 2 6†salmon fillets, cubed 1â€

· 1 qt. milk

· 1 (15 ounce) can creamed corn

· 1 teaspoon cornstarch

· 1 12 oz. pkg. Cream cheese

1. Sauté bacon, then add butter, onion, broth, celery, and garlic powder & cook until onions, carrots, and celery are tender. Stir in potatoes, old bay seasoning, parsley, bay leaves, salt, pepper, and dill.

2. Bring to a boil, and reduce heat. Cover, and simmer 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender.

3. Stir in salmon, add parmesan cheese along with milk, creamed corn, flour, cornstarch, and cream cheese. Cook on medium, stirring frequently until heated through and cream cheese is melted.

4. Serve steaming hot with oyster crackers.

Please let me know how you like it. Thanks

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Yet another secret step.:lol: Don't hold back Bob.

I'm basically A MAN A CAN AND A PLAN, type of cook. This on sure does have a lot of ingredients, but that is probably why it's so good.:)

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Yet another secret step.:lol: Don't hold back Bob.

I'm basically A MAN A CAN AND A PLAN, type of cook. This on sure does have a lot of ingredients, but that is probably why it's so good.:)

Just go by the numbers & you can't go wrong Frank. You'll surprise everyone including yourself how easy it is. No problem. ;)

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Bob

Tried this recipie on sat and It was out of this world :grin:

I'm glad you enjoyed it Joe. It's one of my favorites. :laola:

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I've been making a variation of that (hold the corn please) for years. Amazing how much the guys who were sick of eating walleye and northern (!?:confused:?!) midweek in the Quebec tundra liked that soup!

I initially made it from ready an acticle in a magazine (F & S?) about how to get a meal from catching small bluegills on ponds and lakes with a stunted population.

YUMMY!

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I've been making a variation of that (hold the corn please) for years. Amazing how much the guys who were sick of eating walleye and northern (!?:confused:?!) midweek in the Quebec tundra liked that soup!

I initially made it from ready an acticle in a magazine (F & S?) about how to get a meal from catching small bluegills on ponds and lakes with a stunted population.

YUMMY!

Egads man, Chowder, chowder, chowder!!! Salmon soup just don't sound right. :lol::lol::lol:

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i made this one last nite for dinner and all i can say is ,WOW ,this is one of the best chowders i think ive ever made :good:

terry

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I edited your original post and added where to add the parmesan cheese.

I gave this recipe to a coworker at work on Friday. He brought in a sample on Monday. Today I made a double batch for myself and my family. I am planning on freezing a bunch of it. I hope it stays OK in the freezer. Has anyone ever froze it before?

Great recipe Bob! Thanks for sharing.

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Well, I have just got to try this after so many good reviews. Maybe this weekend.:butcher:

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It took me 2.5 hours to make this.

Time well spent during the winter GLF. ;) I'm glad you enjoyed it and thank you for editing the post for me. The chowder does freeze well. I've eaten it a month or two later and it's just as good.

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I have been asked to make this for a fund raiser that we have at East Martin Christian Church this commming sat. It is there annual wild game dinner and approx 500 people attended last year. The last batch I made, which was the first batch that I ever made was a big hit.

I am going to make two batches this time and one is going to be with smoked salmon as I just made up approx 20lb of smoked salmon for this up and comming dinner.

again thanks bob for sharing a great recipie.

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Thanks for this recipie Muskeybob,

I made this last night and it was great. It took a little while to prepare but it was worth it.

Thanks again

Tom Torrice

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Thanks for this recipie Muskeybob,

I made this last night and it was great. It took a little while to prepare but it was worth it.

Thanks again

Tom Torrice

Thanks Tom ;) I'm always looking for something special in preparing salmon and this was one of the best I've come up with, so far. I enjoy cooking and I appreciate all the kind replies on this recipe.

Like you say, it takes a while to prepare, but when it's something you enjoy you don't mind. It does go faster once you make it a few times & you don't have to keep going back to read the recipe. Good things always take time, but reap rewards when you see others enjoyment.

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I have a question reguarding bay leafs. Why do recipes always call for bay leaf's, then they are removed when finished cooking? What am I missing about bay leaf's? Why not just grind it up and use it that way?

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Silver One, sorry I missed your last post. I'm anxious to find out how the fund raiser worked out. Do you call it Adirondack Salmon Chowder? Please keep us posted with the comments they made. Wish I was there. Thanks

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I have a question reguarding bay leafs. Why do recipes always call for bay leaf's, then they are removed when finished cooking? What am I missing about bay leaf's? Why not just grind it up and use it that way?

Good Question. I have used bay leafs in soups and stews for years. A whole bay leaf or two will add a lot of flavor during cooking. I never gave it any thought as to why they are not ground up like other spices. Bay leafs don't cook well, but impart a unique flavor to the broth. I never make any kind of soup without 2 of them in the pot.:grin:

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