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drathaar907

Best boat set up for lines...

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My typical set up has been a full core down the chute, downriggers on each corner with or without sliders, then a low mag diver on braid each side then a high regular diver on braid each side. When I try to run boards as well usually trouble develops. I use the off-shore yellow boards with anything from a mono flat line to a 5 color off those, again... that's where the trouble starts tangles etc. My new boat I just got is much wider than the one I have been using for years. I have not fished it yet so looking for opinions as to best line set. I have been reading here some guys using up to 3 long line each side... Wow, I'd be scared to death but I must be doing something wrong with my lines. How are you guys setting those up? My best fish catcher has been the dipsys... My boat does have outriggers so if they are a factor here let me know. Thanks, Tim

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what other lines are involved in the tangle with your board lines.

I run

2 DR on the corners w free sliders

2 wire low divers

4-6 coppers Walleye boards

1-2 high braid divers

My copper and high divers can run in any irder depending on what is getting hit

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I cannot add much to this post,I just purchased two boards this fall without time to figure them out. My spread has been DRs on each corner with a high diver on braid and my low divers on wire. It will be a great learning experience with these boards,but damn I'm going to have fun......

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Biggest thing I do to avoid lines getting tangled is to deploy the long line poresentations with the deepest sets closest to the boat. Depending on how many anglers I have on board I will have up to 10 lines out (4 anglers onboard -- legally could run 12, but I don't).

Working from the center of the boat to the outsides and also from the stern to the bow as far as rod locations:

  • 2 stern downriggers -- one usually with a SWR and a flasher on the other to try to attract fish into the spread
  • 2 outdown downriggers -- usually with fixed sliders 10-20' above the ball, spoons or plugs
  • 2 PP high divers on 2.5 or 3, with flasher/fly, spoons, or plugs
  • 2 wire divers on 1 or 1.5, usually with big flashers with cut-bait or flasher/fly
  • 2 300' copper off walleye boards
  • 2 leadcore up to a fullcore off walleye boards

Any of the individual presentations can be removed or another substituted, but the overall is:

It must run 20' shallower/deeper than either the line/presentation adjacent to it (except downriggers)

Setting it up this way has two advantages:

1. When you need to reset a line it can generally be deployed without getting tangled because it will go over all of the lines inside it.

.... a. boards w/ weighted lines are let out the back and when far enough back then the reel is put in gear and the board will then pull to the side into formation

.....b. the "high" divers are set by deploying in front of the "low" divers to let them pull out away from the boat and other diver but still be above it

2. When a fish hits and pulls back away from the boat, it will go over the top of the presentations inside of it as the fish is brought behind the boat to fight and land it.

90% of the time fish are fought and netted down the chute of my boat -- right between the two outboards. Although a down the cute presentation of a weighted line (copper or leadcore) or a pumphandle can have its days, I prefer to keep that area open.

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Separation is the the key to fishing multiple lines. I have ran 4 boards 2 divers and 2 rigger per side and never had a problem. I have also ran just 6 rods and been tangled all day. It all comes down to do you have the room to run the stuff. My 16 rod Steelhead spread is close to 800ft wide. Most people do not realize their divers may be under and outside of the boards. So if I am running divers my 300 or longer copper will be at least 100 to 125ft from the boat I am constantly yelling at my crew to let them out further. A wire diver set on 2 let out 200ft will hit a 300 copper running 50 to 60 ft from the boat darn near every time the mess is no fun to clean up. That is running a fairly straight course start turning or run a zig zag pattern and you need even more room. My standard tournament setup is 8 rods 2 boards and a wire diver and rigger per side. This setup will still likely be 250 to 300ft wide yep we have reel them in for traffic now and then but I tend to fish away from the pack as much as possible. Another reason for 8 rods is if one fires we can put a replacement for it back in while fighting the fish and not be over rod limits.

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3 riggers, all with siders, 2 highs, 2 lows if were in deep enought water and anywhere from 6-14 boards. Drop them in slow and steady, boards are usually as far out as traffic will allow.

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Ya goto get the boards out far enough so they clear the divers.

When we have a big enough crew, we run 1 riggers, 2 divers, and 3 boards per side.

We like to keep the shoot open for fighting, and landing fish.

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After fishing with a couple guys on the forum I was shown I wasn't running my boards out nearly far enough. Letting them run waaaay out there cut my tangles last year to zero. Just make sure you have plenty of backing on your reels.

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Don't forget to pay attention to the current. If you're running sideways to it while setting copper or leadcore, the likelihood of getting tangles increases greatly. It's best to set going into the current, going with it would be second. I check the weather buoy on my way out the door every morning so I know which way the current is flowing and its strength. This can help with having an idea of whether the fish may have moved or not as well. I usually get away with running leadcore next two each other that is 2-3 colors different, although for steelies I will run a one, two, 3.5 and 5 on each side without trouble. Just make sure to keep the boards far enough apart and make gradual turns. For copper, I don't put anything closer than 50 next to each other, but it would be common for me to run a 200, 250, and 300 off of each side. I run two riggers, 4 divers and 6 boards of my 20' Lund Tyee Mag typically without much difficulty. Of course I have to cut back when it gets rougher.

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Omg you guys are killing me , I have a 15' beam and I have issue with tangles with 6 rods !!!!!! Holy **** batman.... But I've been getting better at it . I believes issues are that I run everything off the sides. I have a large swim plate form and it gets in the way. My low divers get tangled with my riggers sometimes.but I'm learning to spread it out.enyty5um.jpge2u7u7u2.jpg

I'm going to mount a s/s rail on the platform with rod holders out there, we actually fight the fish on the plat form because Mama says NO Feesh onboard so the carpet doesn't get bloody ........... She's the Boss Guys!!!!

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Cool post...agreed though...separation is the key....got pretty decent in my 18' Lund at running 8-9 rods. 1 rigger, 1 low diver, 2-3 walleye boards per side. Usually 400, 300, 200 copper on one side; 350, 250, 150 on the other. Moving to a larger boat this year and don't expect to change much except go to 1 rigger, 2 divers, and 2-3 planers per side depending on crew size.

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... I believes issues are that I run everything off the sides. I have a large swim plate form and it gets in the way. My low divers get tangled with my riggers sometimes.but I'm learning to spread it out....

The only thing that I run off the stern are the two stern downriggers. Everything else (outdown riggers, divers, boards) are off the sides. I don't do it, but I do have friends that almost never bring a fish into the boat proper. Similarly to your boat's setup, they have a very big cooler (150 Q Igloo) on the swim platform (although your swim platform does look VERY deep in your picture). They have a boarding door to the platform and go out on the platform to net fish it goes directly into the cooler to be unhooked. It would have to be pretty calm seas for me to get out on a swim platform to fight a fish. I'd be nervous going out there to do the netting.

Looks like you have a wide transom but I suspect that the "fishing area" not very deep (back to front)??? Something that might help a lot to get more rods in the water -- especially boards with leadcore/copper -- would be vertical rod trees. The space taken on the gunnel is what would normally be taken up by a single regular rod holder but the tree gives you 3 or 4 rod holders. The Big Jon and Traxstech trees also allow the rod holders to be angled up & down which would permit you to lower the bottom one closer to horizontal for use with a diver.

Not really related to getting more rods in the water on your boat, but it also appears in the 2nd picture that you don't put a lot of bend in your downrigger rods. I would suggest really increasing the bend in those rods significantly. I have much better hook up rates when the rods are really loaded up. Some guys I know actually put enough bend in that the rod tips are nearly in the water. It helps let you know when you have a strike and helps to take up the line slack on a strike.

Taking a shot in the dark here since your pictures don't show it, but if the boss doesn't want fish in the boat I would guess that cluttering up the hull with rod holders is also frowned upon? If so, seriously check into a track system for the gunnels. Allows for downriggers, individual rod holders, trees... to be put on the boat when fishing. When not fishing the gear can be removed and be replaced with step pad inserts. Very clean setups that keep the boat "clean" for non fishing situations. Also means that you only mount the track directly to the boat. You can also mount accessories such as cup holders for non fishing time use.

It is hard to tell, but in the 2nd picture it also appears that you have all of the rods angled pretty high. It is a lot easier to run more rods if some are angled closer to horizontal. For downriggers and divers that are closer to the stern it keeps those rods out of the way for fighting fish. For divers it helps keep the diver set as it won't have as much up/down motion as the boat rocks in heavier seas. A track system helps with getting the diver rods closer to horizontal because you can get rod holders for the track that can be adjusted up & down.

Although my boat is really a fishing boat (no boss for me :rolleyes:) I have a track system and it makes it very versatile to customize the setup to fit the situation. It also makes it nice to be able to move things and try different configurations which you might never do without a track since it would mean drilling more holes in the boat. My downriggers, rod holders, and rod trees are all mounted on the tracks. For example, when I go walleye fishing on Erie, the downriggers come off to give more room for casting, and the rod holders and rod trees are moved to optimal locations for trolling and bottom bouncer rods.

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OK I get that on the BEND on the rods ,I can't get mine to stay bent to the water and I wrap the line twice around my releases. What am I doing wrong??? Also I have a Big Jon dual rod holder on each side so I can adjust the diver rods down to the water here's the back fishing area zoom in and you can see my set up.the new canopy is not rod friendly that's why I go to the transom door and fight the fish , also we don't go out on platform in rough seas we rarely even fish in rough seas , I am not like you guys , you guys are pros and I always have the wide onboard driving ..... Need I say more???etude5e7.jpg

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4 riggers, all with free sliders. Set in a V pattern deep inside to shallow on the outside. I run 2 to 4 divers depending on how many are on board, and 6 boards off of Great Lakes Planer 3 hi rod holders. Walleye boards. Usually start spring with everything set up to fish shallow water. We run yellow birds in shallow water for Coho and Browns. You can run up to 12 rods on a boat with an 8' Beam. Stay away form the Pack, and long slow turns. Do not I repeat do not run across current with a 12 rod spread or you are looking for a mess. Always have believed in running as many lines as the crew can handle. My boat has a 12' beam and makes running more rods really easy. Downriggers are still the best presentation for getting the job done, and if I could swing the cost would be running 6 of them. If I never have to run Copper or Leadcore.I am happy camper. Riggers and Divers rule.

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Supertramp I can run 12 rods I only have two people maybe 3 onboard and the 3rd is a 14 year old girl so most I can run is nine . I am going to run boards though this year. Just two though 1 per side....

Maniac...... What's your opinion on this

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Supertramp I can run 12 rods I only have two people maybe 3 onboard and the 3rd is a 14 year old girl so most I can run is nine . I am going to run boards though this year. Just two though 1 per side....

Maniac...... What's your opinion on this

Again I repeat riggers rule, then Dipseys, unless you have 4 to 6 on board, I hate fishing short on crew members, makes it really hard to run spread. Try the Greatlakes Angler rod trees they will help you keep your lines separated. Just run your deepest lines inside and I run my 300 to 450 coppers closest to the boat and Then my 200 copper outside that and my furthest out is usually a Leadcore of some length depending on the target. I catch a lot of Steelhead on 5 and 6 color leadcore in the middle of the summer. Just stay with what works, and try to get some more people on board. Its a lot of fun and great family time.

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, I am not like you guys , you guys are pros and I always have the wide onboard driving ..... Need I say more???etude5e7.jpg

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Wife wife wife not wide,damn finger can't type,I can't get my rigger rods to bend maybe I need to wrap the release more

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OK I get that on the BEND on the rods ,I can't get mine to stay bent to the water and I wrap the line twice around my releases. What am I doing wrong??? ...

What are you running for releases? I have gone to the Chamberlain releases for the last 4 years. Basically the same as Blacks/Dubro/Walker. You make a loop in the line and put 5-6 twists in it and then put the loop through the catch arm and lock it into the release. Difference between the Chamberlain and the others is that it has two tension adjustments -- one for the rod and one for the lure. This lets you adjust the lure release tension to match the lure and/or fish species, but also clamp down the tension on the rod adjustment to be able to put a heavy bend in the rod.

Others will use a rubber band half hitched to the line with multiple wraps and the tag end through the arm on a Blacks/Dubro/Walker or Chamberlain release.

Here is a video of the Chamberlain:

http://youtu.be/WsgUj7fIi50

Here is a video of the release with a rubber band:

http://youtu.be/B-qTqZOFLnU

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I'm running blacks but I've only been twisting it like twice so it's slipping most likely I'm going to do the 5-6 twists and see what happens .

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, I am not like you guys , you guys are pros and I always have the wide onboard driving ..... Need I say more???etude5e7.jpg

I dont know if I could get away with calling my girl wide:eek:

Walleye boards have a backwards facing clip so you dont have to wrap. The farther away from the boat you can get the less bend you will have. My rods are are not bent toward the water at all.

Maybe im misunderstanding you post

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My typical set up has been a full core down the chute, downriggers on each corner with or without sliders, then a low mag diver on braid each side then a high regular diver on braid each side. When I try to run boards as well usually trouble develops. I use the off-shore yellow boards with anything from a mono flat line to a 5 color off those, again... that's where the trouble starts tangles etc. My new boat I just got is much wider than the one I have been using for years. I have not fished it yet so looking for opinions as to best line set. I have been reading here some guys using up to 3 long line each side... Wow, I'd be scared to death but I must be doing something wrong with my lines. How are you guys setting those up? My best fish catcher has been the dipsys... My boat does have outriggers so if they are a factor here let me know. Thanks, Tim

Sounds like what a lot of my friends run in the morning starting out on the bank,one will run 4 riggers 2 dips a side and one board aside when they make there first pass,once they move off the bank they start adding there boards with 150,200,250 and full cores of copper depending on were the fish are.

P.M. pioneer or hazard,they both fish the bank.

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Thanks for all the input here. Looks like, after reading here... I need to get some copper in my spread. A few questions on the copper: Do I set them out first on boards, or wait until riggers, dipsy's are out then go over the top? Is it best to have a roller rod for copper? What size rod? When setting out multiple boards per side, how far between boards and how close is your closest board to the boat? Knots for backing... double uniknot? Thanks Tim

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Thanks for all the input here. Looks like, after reading here... I need to get some copper in my spread. A few questions on the copper: Do I set them out first on boards, or wait until riggers, dipsy's are out then go over the top? Is it best to have a roller rod for copper? What size rod? When setting out multiple boards per side, how far between boards and how close is your closest board to the boat? Knots for backing... double uniknot? Thanks Tim

It really doesn't matter when you put them out. I usually set my riggers and dipseys and the I let out my hi long lines and get the board way out to the side, next comes the short copper or a full core, then the 300 to 450. The key is let the line straight out the back, attach the board and slowly let it go back and after it clears your short stuff let start letting it swing to the side and continue letting out line until it is where you want in relation to the rest of the spread. a nice V starting deep in the middle and working to the shallowest presentation. This allows you to re set the outside lines with out having to bring the other boards in/

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Thanks for all the input here. Looks like, after reading here... I need to get some copper in my spread. A few questions on the copper: Do I set them out first on boards, or wait until riggers, dipsy's are out then go over the top? Is it best to have a roller rod for copper? What size rod? When setting out multiple boards per side, how far between boards and how close is your closest board to the boat? Knots for backing... double uniknot? Thanks Tim

One of the best ways to shorten the learning curve on all of this is to get out with other guys who have the experience. I'm sure there are guys on this site that would be willing to share a seat for a day. Another option, several charter captains including myself offer on-the-water classes and they will cover anything you want to know, including everything from how to rig up copper lines, to suggestions on how to best set up your new boat for trolling, and anything else in between. My biased opinion of course, but very worth the investment to shorten that learning curve and help avoid a lot of learning "mistakes" along the way.

For copper its best to have a fairly sturdy rod, this allows your planer board to run better. Personally I like the Okuma GLT Copper/Leadcore Rods 8'6". The nice wide stainless guides are great for sliding those knots thru.

Everyone has their preference for backing/knots/etc. I set mine up with 300 yards of 50# powerpro, then I use a double-uni knot to about a 6 foot piece of 50# mono (this is to clip the planer board to), then I tie the mono to a small (I think #8) spro two way swivel, and tie the copper to the other end of that swivel. I do the same thing on the leader-end, with a swivel between the copper and mono or flouro leader.

You'll get a feel for distance between boards as you go. You'll want your inside board far enough out to avoid tangling with your outermost dipsy when a fish hits the dipsy and comes up toward the surface.... again, you'll get the hang of judging that distance with some practice.

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