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Possible state record Atlantic?


phishtix

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Thats insane. Whether it was a Brown or Atlantic its crazy not to have a fish like that officially documented. Thats a beast of a fish! Its rare to get a KING that big on Lake Michigan, let alone a land locked Brown or Atlantic!!!!

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The vomerine teeth usually will tell, not just the count but the pattern. Odd they didn't look at the tongue shape as well, since one has a squared tongue and the other has a tongue that tapers to appear more pointed.

A friend purchased a Wellcraft 19 from a guy on Torch Lake a few years back. During the sea trial he got an invite to come back and fish Atlantics in the fall when they congregate off a stream there. He said they caught several very nice fish.

Odd that they did not photograph the fish, which would lend a record of the spotting pattern as well as the general "look" of the fish. Atlantics have a slightly more pointed head than Browns. Since they had the fish's skeleton, they can remove the otoliths from the brain case and get an accurate age on this fish.

Yoda, would be the best assessor of how this fish would eat, since he takes Atlantics routinely in waters he fishes. My guess, pretty greasy at that size.

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They looked at the vomerine teeth, but had trouble discerning the pattern as the teeth were broken off from being hooked and the ensuing battle. It also stated that this fish had both round and X shaped spots indicative of both a brown and an atlantic. And they also examined the tongue according to the article, but couldnt come up with a proof positive identification on this trait because of the freezing process that took place with the remains. That was tough on allot of their research by the sounds of it.

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If you find yourself in this situation personally: Brown Trout- maxillary bone extends well behind the eye socket in mature fish,10 branchiostegal rays, a broad squarish tongue with STRONG tongue and vomerine tooth patterns, a deeper head profile-males kype in spawning period, usually no spots on their gill cover, round or weakly round dark spots.

Atlantic Salmon-Maxillary bone seldom extends past the eye socket, except in some large males, 12 branchiostegal rays, a narrow more pointed tongue with weak tongue and Vomerine teeth, a narrow markedly pointed head profile-males kype in spawning period, some spots on their gill cover, x shaped dark spots.

If they simply asked the guys who caught the fish whether it went airborne immediately or slugged it out deep, they would have also been able to get a good direction to go on their identification process.

Definitions:

The branchiostegal rays are those fleshy ridges in the thtoat area of the fish. Vomerine teeth are in the roof of the mouth immediately down the midline of the fish, palatine teeth rows extend laterally. The elliptical shape bone that is a part of the upper jaw, extending in a plate-like fashion at the corner of the fish's mouth is the maxillary bone.

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If you find yourself in this situation personally

I can only dream of that ever happening. A 29lb brown OR atlantic. Either way it'd be going to the taxidermist. And I guarantee I'd have plenty of pictures to go along with it :)

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If they simply asked the guys who caught the fish whether it went airborne immediately or slugged it out deep, they would have also been able to get a good direction to go on their identification process.

Rick

I completely understood and agree with this verse:D

Talking with Doc Said one day and your name came up. He classed you as an encyclopedia With Legs! I have to agree with that one as well:grin:

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They might be checking to see if it is a cross between an Atlantic and a Brown Trout. Then you would have a record of another type. What would they call it? I believe that these fish exist and they raise them in a hatchery in Illinois for market only.

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Bob,

You are likely right. That would go a long way toward explaining how the fish came to be that large from an inland lake. Assuming it was an infertile hybrid, all energy intake would go into body growth and not gamete production.

I looked up a couple of studies from aquaculture journals and wild-spawning fish populations. Apparently, first generation hybrids (F1) can be fertile in the wild, back crossing with either maile or female Atlantic Salmon, but not Brown Trout. Non-disjunction during meiosis from broadly miss-matched chromosome counts is probably the mechanism for F1 hybrids X Brown Trout crosses to not produce viable eggs.

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