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LongLine

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10 Good

About LongLine

  • Rank
    Advanced Fisherman
  • Birthday 01/16/1951

Personal Information

  • Real Name
    Tom
  • Location
    ROCHESTER NEW YORK
  • Interests
    FISHING LK ONTARIO
  • Occupation
    ENGINEER
  1. Never on the fin as the line to the lure will steer the weight where you don't want it, especially on turns.
  2. so much for the wise-guy answer. Actually very few guys can troll in a perfectly straight line and on a curve/turn one rigger will always speed up faster than the boat is going and the other will go slower. Just like spinning a weight on a string over you head. Your hand barely moves but the weight is really whipping around. Moral is to always zig-zag and then match whatever speed catches a fish. Watching bubbles, bow in cable, sound of clicker, bend in the rod all work but probe speed is the easiest and takes currents out of the equation. The exact numerical value isn't nearly as important as being able to replicate it.
  3. when it was snagged on the bottom.
  4. GPS speed is not all that accurate as some guys believe, especially at the low end. If it was, it wouldn't hold steady when there's a little chop on the water.
  5. What about those that guarantee a fish or you don't have to pay? I'm sure those selling laws were aimed at guys selling to stores or trying to make some cash and not paying taxes. Also, who knows what health laws/guidelines get ignored?
  6. 1. Physiologically, a salmon can see a wider angle and farther, in front of him than behind him. Logically, he'll get a better/longer look at it if you pull it from his right to left or his left to right. i.e. it'll be in his viewing area longer. Your stream fisherman cast out into the stream and the current brings it back towards shore, hence across his view, regardless if the fish is pointing upstream or downstream. 2. Salmon in the lake don't sit still. They go all over the place. Therefore, don't overthink it... ...fish across the current. You'll cover more depth, as a plus.
  7. I'd guess you're fishing under the fish on Lake Ontario early in the morning. Just because you're over deep water doesn't mean they're way down in the column. I've caught many fish early only 10 ft down over 100-150 FOW on Big-O. Ontario (southern shore) has a lot of up-welling's & crazy currents.
  8. I hope this guy is not a Ph.D candidate. We don't need more educated dummy's. Inflation & fast talking salesmen are what has increased beach property $. Not to mention cash strapped communities looking to raise taxes. Mussell shells will cut your feet to ribbons (as mentioned way down in the article.) But they also filter out the zooplankton that aquatic life needs to survive. They don't touch the pollutant garbage. Also they're great food for gobies which also just happen to love smallmouth minnows.
  9. Crimp on the tube is to keep it in place.
  10. Run the Black's on the cable above the probe. Here's how. Get a 2 3/4" length of spray tube - like off a WD-40 spray can. Slip it on the cable; Do not remove the coating where the release will go. Put a small electrical connector crimp between the legs of the release. Then attach the probe to the cable as in the instruction book. Tape up your connection to the probe then slide the release on the spray tube down to the tape and crimp the crimp real good. The release will still rotate, will stay put and will not rub the coating on the cable away. I've done this for years and still get good signal way down deep.
  11. I don't think there's any more frustrating feeling than after you've spent 6 hours trolling the 20 ft line and coming home; look on the internet and finding reports of catching them in 30 FOW. In those rare instances when I troll parallel to the shoreline, I'll bracket a certain depth. say 15-30 ft. If nothing then move out 35-50FOW. I never troll in a straight line unless someone else comes too close.
  12. 15 Lb P-Line cxx. Used to use Maxima but that stuff got expensive.
  13. Check this site out. Scroll down on page of surface temps for look at bottom. Also use the pull downs for nowcast & forecast. Look thru the different hours & look for patterns. The lakes change from hour to hour so going strictly by one view is useless. Chances are real good you can find how deep the temp change is. i.e. if it's 50 down then fish deeper than 50 ft. http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/res/glcfs/glcfs.php?lake=m&ext=swt&type=N&hr=00
  14. Possibly a thermal plume. i.e. vertical temp gradient with debris caught in it.
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