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Since recent success with using planer boards, I was curious about a couple things. For one, whats the best way to clip the board so you don't lose it when you break the line (two in the past week or so).

And also, how do you run two on one side of the boat? Is it just a matter of the amount of line you put out? On the same note, we are currently running two lead core on the planers, but would like to add two more planer boards to the mix, do you suggest investing in copper rather than more lead core so we would be running two lead core and two copper?

Thanks for any help

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Usually if you break the line you will lose the board unless you spin around fast enough to pick it up. Key is not to break the line. Some tips for that learned the hard way: 1)Keep drags light until you get the board in the boat 2) Inspect clip pads for worn "grooves" from the line. These grooves will prevent the line from releasing smoothly - tendency then is to jerk on the line to get it to release causing it to break. Replace if worn. Agree with others - shallow boards to the outside. Weight behind each board and amount of line out to the board will result in spacing. You can adjust that so you have comfortable spacing between the boards. When comparing lead core to copper my opinion is getting your lures to the desired depth with the least effort is more important than which one you use. Since it takes less copper to achieve depth, I prefer copper and have replaced my leadcore with copper.

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On walleye boards, follow their instructions on how to clip the backer line in to allow it to release when fighting the fish. I used to just clip them straight in, but they release harder that way which I think could lead to higher risk of breaking your line especially if your drag is tighter.

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New Addiction - when I got the package I read how to do the loop but thought it was not necessary, I guess ill have to try that next time out. Thank you all very much for your detailed and helpful tips and suggestions. Still learning the ropes but getting better every trip. Thanks!

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I use a section (about 50 feet) of 30 lb bloodrun's yellow flourocarbon backing behind the leadcore, and I also use Walleye boards. The heavier line will help prevent break off's near the board. New Addiction added some good information - especially about inspecting the pads/clips.

I set my boards to NOT trip. This way if a fish breaks the leader, you can still retrieve the board (it won't slide off). But if you do this, you might want to upgrade to 15 or 20 lb leader material.

As to running more than 1 board on a side - listen to Fowlpursuit - "ALWAYS be sure your deepest lines are towards the inside and your higher lines to the outside or you will have a mess." And pretty much you just let more line out so the board swings farther away from the boat.

As to copper vs leadcore, a lot of people love to run a 250 to 300 copper. It depends what length of leadcore you are running, but I like running a full core and a seven color on one side of the boat, and then running a 300 copper and a 200 copper on the other side of the boat.

I would also suggest trying to find someone who fishes a lot of core/copper and see their setup. A lot of this information I've picked up from guys I've fished with, or have fished with me on my boat.

Good luck out there.

-jdh

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Not sure where I picked this up, but it has worked good - I tie a rubber band to my backer in the area just back from the board clip. I put the line and half of the rubber band loop inside the board pin. When the board releases, the rubber band keeps the board from sliding down. Occasionally it slips down a little but always stops at the connection of the backer to the leadcore/copper. When you get the board off the line at the boat, you can just reel the rubber band in. When you let it back out you can either re-use the rubber band or pull it off & replace it. Not sure if this is common but it's worked good for me for a few years now. Think I only had 1 time that the rubber band broke and the board slid all the way down to the lure.

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30# backer minimum. I run a variety of backer line types and have spliced in a section of 30# Ande mono to pinch the release off from (walleye boards). I second the rubber band trick except I use 2 rubber bands in case one breaks. Over time the bands will need to be replaced as they deteriorate with exposure.

I set mine to release because it is very much a pain to fight a fish with a deep sixed board.

27# leadcore with 25# fluoro leaders. That way if there is a breakoff it should be in the leader - not the core and not the backing.

If you use mono only for the releases then they should not wear or slip. I used superlines before and now need to replace my release clips.

Good luck - they catch fish for sure!!

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personal preference on if you set the boards to release or not and same for lead vs copper. as said maybe fish with some others and or experiment on your own i like copper. for more than 1 board per side the shallowest running setup-lets say 3 color lead will be furthest from the boat and this rod will be furthest toward the bow, pointed higher up in the air, or both then lets say a 7 color lead or 250 copper would be closest to the boat with that rod tip lower and or closer to the stern. hope this helps, good luck.

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