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Copper attachment


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Here's a thought. How about splicing a piece of 40 # mono every 100' in your copper to attach boards. Use a small spro 80 # swivel on each end of the splice. Then you can set a 500 copper at 100,200 300,400 or run all way to 500. This will cut down on how many rods you have to carry to fish copper at different depths , especially for those with smaller boats!!!

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Here's a thought. How about splicing a piece of 40 # mono every 100' in your copper to attach boards. Use a small spro 80 # swivel on each end of the splice. Then you can set a 500 copper at 100,200 300,400 or run all way to 500. This will cut down on how many rods you have to carry to fish copper at different depths , especially for those with smaller boats!!!

On paper that is an awesome theory! Economical and effective! But unfortunately it's not practical. It'll cause some SERIOUS headaches.

Here's why.

Board hopping Board Hopping Board Hopping. If you've ever run a monofilament backer in any type of wind you know EXACTLY what im talking about. This is when line from one rod going to your planerboard will cross and go underneath the planerboard next to it. This is caused from extreme bow in the line. Yes, running one on each side will fix this, but totally defeats the purpose of copper. Spacing does not help because it creates more bow. This is why those mono backing material and heavy monofilament just are not practical. Secondly, having extraweight on the front of a planer board will cause the board to dive when fish over about 15lbs hit the bait, and make any type of run.

My suggestion is for the economical fisherman is to buy the most productive copper setups for the year. Somewhere between the 225 and 300 mark. These lengths of copper are solid choices for the majority of the year. For the weekend warrior that is a rod you can use pretty much every trip!

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I use this but with only one splice. I have a 300 copper with just enough mono at 200 to go from the board to the boat (75-100') so I'm not hanging copper between the 2. It works fine for me giving me the option of using it as a 200 or a 300 copper. I wouldn't want to more than one though as it adds a lot of line. It does make a long line to reel in when its all out.

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The amount of weight on the nose of the board would give you fits when you try to bring the board to the boat. I run 3 long lines per side on my boat, usually a short core out side then any thing from a full core to a 225 copper in the middle and a 300 copper on the inside. That set up works for us. Cheap doesn't catch fish, the right presentation for the conditions is what works. If I never had to run a copper or lead core set up I would be really happy. But that is not the case in todays Great Lakes. I still catch more fish off of Dipseys and riggers than long presentations as it is. How many people really enjoy catching fish on 300' of copper?

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Here's a thought. How about splicing a piece of 40 # mono every 100' in your copper to attach boards. Use a small spro 80 # swivel on each end of the splice. Then you can set a 500 copper at 100,200 300,400 or run all way to 500. This will cut down on how many rods you have to carry to fish copper at different depths , especially for those with smaller boats!!!

Why not just use torpedo divers and accomplish the same thing. I have used my shorter coppers and added torpedo divers to the and effectively turned 150 coppers into 400 or longer coppers with only the need for 300 feet of line out. I started doing this years ago as I decided I didn't want to torture my friends or myself reeling in miles of line.

What I have done as of last year is set up 2 rods just with braid for when I need to get deep and run the large torpedo divers and use 2 of them spaced according to how deep I am targeting. I'm still able to reach extreme depths and not need to have more than 400 feet of line out.

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if you wanted to make a chute rod only, then I could see someone doing that. Are for the amount of knots in a line, I dont think that would be a factor, I mean my 450 has 3 splices in it and lasted all August and September.

you and dana need to get off them wallets and buy some copper:lol:

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