Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BenLubbs

Filling Transom Holes

Recommended Posts

So I really dug into getting the new graph put in tonight and in the process of replacing the old transducer decided I would move the new one to the other side and remove the 3 other units mounted to the back of the boat that are not being used. Now I'm left with 2 unused holes in the transom, one about 3/8" diameter, one about 3/4". These are both above the water line and show no rot around the holes. There are also a bunch of unused mounting screw holes below the water line.

My plan is for the bigger holes, get some wooden dowel approximately the size of the hole, epoxy it over, put it in the hole and epoxy it in place then repair the spot with a gel coat repair kit. For the smaller holes I'm thinking clean them out good with a drill, pack them full of epoxy, and then repair the point with the gel coat repair kit.

Does this sound like the right approach or should I be doing something different?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used 3M 5200 in the past to fill holes in the transom. Works pretty good, hasn't failed yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like you are on the right track..

Keep in mind though that most of the info out there states that a gel coat will not bond to epoxy as well as it does to polyester resin. You may be able to get away with it but your gel coat may end up popping out of the repair.

I went through this last year by filling many holes in my boat. Every hole in the fiberglass was cleaned, drilled to the next size, filled with west system epoxy and re-drilled to prevent water from getting in and rotting my balsa core.

For the holes that I gel coated over I used polyester resin (w/o wax) first to fill the hole (thicken it so that it doesn't run out of the hole w/ west sytem filler). Then put the gel coat over top.

Hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 3M 5200 is what I have had recommended in the past and used with no issues. That stuff is tough... once it dries it really takes some effort to even sand it. For waterline seals that are water tight, it is the way to go. I don't think that I'd put any wood in to fill the holes as it isn't waterproof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out thehulltruth.com for boat repair issues. Or iboats.com.

I think you are on the right track but I'd thicken the epoxy and not bother with the wood dowels. Wet your holes out good with straight (or even thinned) epoxy, let it cure, then fill them with thickened epoxy, then apply your gelcoat repair. Filling the bigger holes might take more than one application.

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=2035&familyName=WEST+System+406+Colloidal+Silica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've used 3M 5200 in the past to fill holes in the transom. Works pretty good, hasn't failed yet.

That's some sticky stuff, you will have it all over if your not careful, great stuff though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've used 3M 5200 in the past to fill holes in the transom. Works pretty good, hasn't failed yet.

I look at 5200 adhesive as the liquid version of duct tape great for alot of fixes:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben, I used the epoxy repair kit and it worked ok. If you really want it to look good and match the rest of the boat talk to Bowker's in Zeeland. I had them fix some other areas on my boat and it looked good and the price was reasonable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason I was thinking put a dowel in there was to give the filler body and I was concerned about thermal shrinking if I used just epoxy or another "caulk" type filler. I'm going to call Bowkers tomorrow and see what price I would be looking at from them, otherwise I picked up some 3m 5200 today that I can use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use 5200 and a stainless screw/bolt (round head) and a nylock nut

That's exactly what I did. No leaks so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i guess im just the hillbilly repairman. i just filled all my extra holes with 100% silicone rubber. it seals good and hasnt come loose yet. i dont know anything about using epoxies on a boat.

and by the way im not making fun of hillbillies, i are one. i grew up in the hills of tenn and have always been proud to call myself a hillbilly,LOL. as a matter of fact i am in tenn right now visiting family.

sherman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i guess im just the hillbilly repairman. i just filled all my extra holes with 100% silicone rubber. it seals good and hasnt come loose yet. i dont know anything about using epoxies on a boat.

and by the way im not making fun of hillbillies, i are one. i grew up in the hills of tenn and have always been proud to call myself a hillbilly,LOL. as a matter of fact i am in tenn right now visiting family.

sherman

You just want to make sure its uv resistant silicone. And marine is even better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want it done right use the dowels grind the area down and re glass it then top coat with gel coat and barrier seal it. To mount the new units make a mounting board out of 1in marine ply and use 5200 to attach it to the hull then mount the new units on that board, no more holes in your hull.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used JB weld on my Islander when I had it. Sanded it smooth and painted right over it. Harder than the aluminium. And its not expensive. It also works good for fixing skag plate on lower unit. good luck. I have also used it on fiber glass cracks on my motor on my duck boat. again better than glass repair kit and sanded it smooth and painted right over it. not even noticable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the smaller holes I use something comparable to 5200 but for the larger holes I usually use MarineTex. Its more of a putty like epoxy and a little easier to work with in larger quantities, it also dries hard so it can be sanded and painted if needed, but either one will work.

I also highly recommend a transducer mounting board (which is made out of a plastic material) to both cover those holes after you have sealed them and to mount the new transducer on so you don't have this same issue next time you change electronics.

Here one I did a long time ago with a Lowrance HDS 8 and Structure Scan transducer.

2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i just did a similar project on 6 old transducer holes that didnt go all the way through the transom. i put a little epoxy in each hole and put the original screws right back into them snug to the transom. havent had a problem yet, and its not really a cosmetic issue bc their all below the waterline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...