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Wire Dipsys


MED747

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There are plenty of options depending on budget. Wire reels are where I like to spend my money as a smooth drag is a must for wire. I tried a few reels but settled on Shimano Tekota's. My second choice, and a little more budget friendly, are the Daiwa Sealine reels. Good drags for the price. I think that I have tried every kind of rod for wire. Started with a cheap roller rod, lost 3 dipsey/flasher/fly setups in 1 day as the wire kept jumping off the guides and getting caught. Got rid of that and went to a Twilli Tip on the end of a regular dipsey rod. That seemed to work ok but the Twilli causes a lot of resistance. After that I tried the Torpedo Tip. I just installed them on a regular dipsey rod. I was very happy with this setup but the issue I had was that I wanted to run 7' rods for wire and couldn't find a regular dipsey rod that short. This year I went to a set of Shimano Talora wire rods since they make them in 7'. I have been very happy with them. The roller guides are high quality and the wire hasn't jumped off the guides once. They are not cheap, but I found them on sale and got them for about $110 each. My second choice would be the Torpedo Tips. They cost about $25 each (I think) and if you pair them with a decent dipsey rod like a Daiwa Heartland (about $30) in whatever length you want you can get a very good wire rod for about half of what the Talora's cost. The next choice for me would be the Twilli Tips and then after that a cheap roller rod. As for wire itself I used the Malin 7 strand and the Torpedo 30 strand. I like the Torpedo wire better as it seems a little more forgiving but either is good. I use a full spool of 1000' for each reel as it fits perfectly on a Tekota 600 or Sealine 47. I am sure other people will have opinions but I think I covered a lot of it.

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As far as reels go you can't beat the okuma catalina reel price about hte same as the shimano tekotas but a smoother drag system and you don't have to have the line counter smackin you in the wrist every time if you use the fore grip on your fishing rod if you palm the reel like a bass fisherman you will be fine with the tekotas, just my 2 cents worth.

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10'6" Daiwa Heartland dipsey rod with a twilli tip and a Daiwa Sealine 47LC is the best bang for your buck for a wire dipsey setup. Sure you can get away with a cheaper rod or reel, but kings will eventually destroy it. You could also break the bank on a $200+ reel and a $200+ roller rod, but they aren't necessary IMO, unless you fish a TON and/or beat the heck out of your equipment.

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I run the sealine 47's, malin 7 strand 30# and Jr's wire dipsy rods. The Jr's rods have tungston guides and no roller or twilli tip. Im fishing 6-8 weekends a year and this setup just finished it's 3rd year with out any problems.

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I currently am running Okuma CV 45D reels spooled with 1000' 30# Mason wire on Shinamo TDR rods with twilli tips. Entire setup less than $180 and it performs great. The rod has plenty backbone to pull the mag dispys and plenty strong enough to bring the fish in. It is certainly the most exciting rod on the boat.

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Currently I run the Cabelas version of the Diawa 47lc, they have a good smooth drag and aren't going to cost u an arm and a leg to get started, I have found the 8' Okuma Dipsey rod to be really good with a Twill tip. The one thing to remember with wire is never take the dipsey off and just let the swivel or snap hang, u will get curly wire. I tie the wire direct to the dipsey with a double overhand knot and have never had a knot break. then when I finish for the day I hook my leader to the hook keeper on the r od and wrap that around the rod by just turning the rod until the leader is wrapped. No kinks no sloppy wire and they dont tangle. easy to store that way too on my boat.

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any reel with a decent drag and retrieve will be just fine. the tekotas and catalinas are awesome reels but definitely on the high end of the budget. A Okuma Clarion would be a great mid-line reel and Convectors are fine too. I use inline rods so that is all i have experience with.

I will highly recommend Blood Run's wire. I have used them all and I do not think any other manufacturers product even compares. From spring to fall, all i fish is wire divers and I fish them hard! Blood Run wire is a much more pliable and softer wire than any other on the market and it is super tough!

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I cheaped out because i only fish salmon 10-12 times a year.

Okuma cv30 d. 25.99

Diawa heartland. 8' 19.99

Both set ups ran awsome. Acounted for over half my fish

I use a steel tube bent in a U shape and crimps. Larger swival goes on befote crimping

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I cheaped out because i only fish salmon 10-12 times a year.

Okuma cv30 d. 25.99

Diawa heartland. 8' 19.99

Both set ups ran awsome. Acounted for over half my fish

I use a steel tube bent in a U shape and crimps. Larger swival goes on befote crimping

Where did you find a cv30 for $25.99??

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I've used 7-foot roller-guide Taloras with Tekota 600 LCs for years, same set-ups, and they worked fine because I like to run four Dipsies, wire on the inside, braids on the outside. But this year, boatless, I have been fishing a lot with Uncle Bud Roche, and he uses 10-foot Blue Diamond roller guide rods (I think 10-footers, might be 9s now I think about it) with Convector Line Counters. Not the best reels int he world, but he also uses the reall long snubbers--I think they are three-footers--and they really seem to help keep fish hooked up. I know I've lost a lot more fish per hookup with standard snubbers and those 7-footers. But Bud runs just two Dipsies. Next season, when I have a boat again (hoping!) I still plan to run the 7-footers and give those long snubbers a try. I think Dreamweaver and Warrior both make 'em. I always thought they were goofy until I started fishing a lot with Bud.

Any info on wire dipsys would ne great what to use and how ti use im tired of running braided line! And what is the beat wire rod to be using in your opinions
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Where did you find a cv30 for $25.99??

That flea market looking place in pinconning

I think its called northwoods or northernwoods

In jan

30 d on sale for 49.99 rang up. 25.99

45 l. Sale. 54.99 rang. 29.99

55 l. Sale 69.99. Rang. 39.99

I got 6 30d

2 45 l. & 2 55l. For copper

I tried to tell the lady at the register but she just shrugged

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That flea market looking place in pinconning

I think its called northwoods or northernwoods

In jan

30 d on sale for 49.99 rang up. 25.99

45 l. Sale. 54.99 rang. 29.99

55 l. Sale 69.99. Rang. 39.99

I got 6 30d

2 45 l. & 2 55l. For copper

I tried to tell the lady at the register but she just shrugged

great deal :thumb:

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I'll add one more rod to consider. TLR builds a SiCr(harder than stainless) guided wire/copper rod in an 8'-6" length with a gimbal butt unlike the JRs Tackle rods I have been running for wire. If you go with a roller guide rod, make sure you set it in the rod holder to center the wire on the rollers when a fish hits or bad things will eventually ensue.

These rods and reels get a lot of work on my boat, so I run Tekota 600lc with altered handles for more torque. Same set-up for braid with the exception of Taloras for the rods.

I have run Malin #30, 19-strand Torpedo wire, and Blood Run wire-all have individaul attributes and minor flaws. I have a Blood Run set-up and Torped wire on two rods right now.

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After reading Dave Mull's comments I would echo something he said. As I stated earlier, wire rod set-ups have zero "give"with a fish on. We set our reels to have the drag barely hold the diver and lure at the specified depth. With a fish on, I peg the wire with my thumb to the foregrip when pumping in line, prior reeling down. Via this technique, if a fish decides to run all you need do is lift your thumb and let them take line on strong runs. Don't tighten your drags up after a fish is on. You will lose fewer fish. Its a little like playing Tarpon, drop the rod tip on strong runs so you don't pull-out the hooks, since there is no give. I can see where a long snubber would be advatagous, as Dave mentions.

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Shimano Talora 8' wire rods, and Tekota 600 lc for reels here. The Talora rods are worth the money. You could get buy with a lesser reel.

I started with Daiwa SG47LCA reels on 7' Talora roller rods. Reels were fine with 1,000' of 30# wire fitting perfectly on the spool and fighting fish on the 7' rods was a blast. When I went to 5' booms on my outdown riggers the clearance was a little to close for comfort so I tried the Gander Mountain 8' roller rods. They were good quality (very similar to the Taloras ) but I didn't like that they only had a regular butt cap and no gimbal to keep the rod upright in the rod holder. Since they didn't have a swivel roller on the tip it was not good to have the wire running off the roller when they got turned to the side or upside down.

After two years I sold the GMs and went back to Taloras but 8'ers. At that point lots of people were raving about the Tekotas so I got a pair and put 1,000' of 30# on and again it fit nearly perfectly. I was happy but managed to find a great deal on a pair of 9' Talora rollers with the swivel tips -- a $240 rod new, but I got a pair off Craigslit for $150 :grin::grin:

I am very satisfied with the Talora 9' paired with the Tekota 600LC. I'm not sold that the 600LC is all that much better than the SG47LCA though -- especially for the price difference. I have used wire outfits setup on rods with "regular" eyes and Twillie Tips and the roller rods are much smoother to reel in. I would highly recommend going with a full roller rod. The Taloras are pricey but what makes them the best in my book is how light they are compared to other brands. You don't get worn out by the rod when fighting a fish.

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