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wingnut

release tension

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How do you guys set the amount of tension on your releases and divers. I'm sure most of you fish enough to tell when you have the right tension by feel, but I don't fish for salmon enough to be able to do that. I've thought of using an electronic fish scale and set them to pop at a certain weight but I'm not sure how much is the right amount. Any guidelines that you use?

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For divers it's pretty easy. Set them out the side of the boat with a guess for their release. Now, set the hook and if they pop off they're right. If they don't, then they're too heavy. As you're running them, if they pop off without a fish then with barely a turn tighten them up until they stay out.

For riggers, it depends on what you're running and the size of fish you are after. A flasher fly will make you tighten up your release while a spoon is light. It's pretty much a trial and error thing.

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Mike pretty much said it, but you also have a lot of varying factors to also account for: like speed, weather/wave conditions, what's behind the divers/bait, what size fish is targeted, i.e. time of year, type & size of line:mono/braid/wire/, type and size of diver too. Experiment and go with the norm for starts. What works best one day, doesn't necessarily work best the next, keep flexible.

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in other words its a learning thing. its really hard to tell someone how tight to set the releases. you just start setting them alittle on the light side. if your getting to many false releases you tighten them down alittle at a time untill you stop getting to many false releases.

my answer for both of these problems has been solved with the divers and releases i use. i went to the lite bite slide diver, i can set it alittle tight and then set the lite bite arm as loose as i can. then it wont trip unless something hits it. but even a small fish will trip the diver.

i went to the chamberlain release for my riggers. it has 2 adjustments just like the lite bite diver. you can set the rod tension tight then set the lure tension loose. you can crank your rod down, but if even a small fish hits the lure it will trip. good luck with your fishing.

slidediver.com

downriggerrelease.com

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1 rubber band for spoons, 2 rubber bands for flashers. As far as dipseys, I usually set them just tight enough to not trip on their own. This past weekend with the bigger waves I had to tighten the releases up. It took me a couple of times to get it right.

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Thanks for the replies. Like many have said I'll just have to work at It, till I get the hang of It. I should have Known It's not a one size fits all set up when your pulling different baits, Obvious now. Everyone that posts about the Chamberlain releases sounds positive about them, I'll keep them In mind If I have too much trouble with the Blacks. Thanks again and good fishing.

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Chamberlin's are great, but if you already have the Blacks, i wouldn't spend the extra money to upgrade, I feel the are very comparable once you get them dialed in where you want them...

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Not to side track, but I have trouble getting my chamberlains to crank down hard enough. I can't run a flasher and fly on them past about 50 feet deep even when I have the horizontal adjustment cranked down as hard as it can. Any ideas?

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Not to side track, but I have trouble getting my chamberlains to crank down hard enough. I can't run a flasher and fly on them past about 50 feet deep even when I have the horizontal adjustment cranked down as hard as it can. Any ideas?

you might try putting a small rubberband around the release when running flashers. or contact keith through downriggerrelease.com he may know of a solution to this problem.

sherman

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Not to side track, but I have trouble getting my chamberlains to crank down hard enough. I can't run a flasher and fly on them past about 50 feet deep even when I have the horizontal adjustment cranked down as hard as it can. Any ideas?

Maybe you have a bad release or the set magnet was damaged? Today I had large paddle / flies behind mine with no trouble. Won't use any other for my setup.

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For dipsey just set it up and try to release it yourself a few times in the boat. Grab the line going to your lure and give it a couple tugs and if it takes 3 times to release it then its too tight!

Otherwise just put them out 100 to 150 feet and try to release them. Reel them up 10 to 20 feet taking out any slap line and give them a quick short tug, if they dont release then there also too tight.

Small adjustments will get them perfect and honestly after a couple times setting them out and tripping them to change lures or reset after a fish you will feel the right tension in your hands when snapping the release arm in.

Better to have to reset it becuase it tripped on nothing a time or two than to wrench it down too tight and have your fish hammer it and rip off 30 bucks in gear while your learning.....

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I use scotty's releases. There are two different tension settings. I use the looser setting and bury the line all the way into the pad for all lures and depths. The only time I use the heavy setting is if I am pulling paddles deep. I feel you are better off with a release that will trip with bigger fish but might need to assist smaller fish with the release. I think the fish get a better hook set if they gotta tug a bit against the release. I also set my rods nearly horizontal to the water and cinch them tight enough so most of the bow is out of the line. The Scotty's have a 12" leader that helps you see shakers better. I have used blacks in the past and they do work well, but I think the Scotty's are a little easier on the line and easier to set.

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