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Slider question


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We tried several lengths through the years and have to agree with Matt, 2-1/2' to 3' works best in all situations and keeps the slider away from the main. Using the slider doubles your chances for a fish on the same rod, it also sometimes produces two fish on the same rod, I like. Nowthen, how far are you running the slider above the main, and do you take advantage of natural blowback, or use a rubberband? Just curious what you guys do on that tactic.

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I prefer to call that slider pinned as a stacker, it's also a good idea in rougher water, short hit days by the fish, smaller fish knocking that can't get hooked days, big fish that are biting real hard, etc.. The other I prefer is just a free slider, using the natural trolling speed to suspend it, I've also heard it called gravity slider, not often though, but effective maximum use of each rod on the riggers is the idea.

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We run a 2-3" piece of surgical tubing with green beads on each side of it on the main downrigger line. Cut a slit in the tubing about half way through it. We run a number 3 swivel on each end of a 6'ish piece of mono. You then run your swivel for your slider through that small slit in the tubing and run your main line down and then pitch the slider out how ever high above your main you want to run it. The surgical tubing will keep it right there (if it is the right diameter). When a fish hits the slider it runs down the line and hits the release. If a fish hits the main line, the slider will run up the rod and the beads will prevent the surgical tubing from getting stuck in your rod eyelets and just run down the main line. The only disadvantage is that you get the slider stuck in the net with the fish at times. But that is why we have a second net on the boat just in case we can't get the one clear.

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Mark, that's a good post, esp. the part about having a second net on board, at the ready for any snafus that may happen, like dropping a net overboard, losing a net in rough water, or not secured properly, or just an older net that breaks and bottoms out. I have even carried a third net below in the bunk area, just in case my two cockpit nets fail, or just disappear accidentally....lol. You can't have too much tackle or insurance when fishing, if you are serious about the harvesting that is. Getting back to sliders, I like to position mine between 10'-15' above the main, it's going to look like it's swimming with the main, and gives most bites a chance to reel the slack in before the fish can spit that lure. I have seen guys run the slider at the top of the water after setting the main line down over 30'-100'. How on earth do you expect to reel in 100' of line to the slider from the main if you do this without the fish getting away? I've also seen a couple of guys use a 50' or 100' long slider, the same thing usually happens too. Sliders are a tool, not a trick or joke, use them to your advantage, not disadvantage.

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